1935 Lincoln K Convertible Roadster – This Was Iconic

(Photo Source: Lincoln/mecum.com)
The 1935 Lincoln K Convertible Roadster was indeed one of a kind

Luxurious cruising even at the early turn of the century played an indisputable role in shaping the automobile space. In the 1930s this market was heavily affected by the Great Depression that took a toll on lots of industries.

Nonetheless, several brands still managed to find their footing and remained afloat amidst all this cacophony. Back then, the James Flood book series was synonymous with car lovers particularly in Australia where it was produced.

Today, like the cars the magazine reviewed, it is in high demand in auction circles. In one issue, this highly regarded magazine described a 1935 Lincoln Model K LeBaron Coupe as The car of Presidents, Kings, gangsters and film stars” and “The fastest stock car in the post-war vintage years.”

Such was how prestigious the Lincoln Model K was. In 1931, Lincoln engineered the luxurious convertible Roadster and gave it a new styling, more power but still lowered the price to make it more affordable to a larger population. This car now carried 120hp from 90 hp.

But it was the body styling that endeared this car to fans and enthusiasts. It came with an increased wheelbase at 145 inches, an elongated hood stylish rounded bumpers that made it sit low and spot a sleek look.

Then it was given the then applauded trumpet horns and massive bowl-shaped headlights. Back then, this was an extraordinary stunning look.

Precisely, this car would go on to perform amazingly at the table of luxurious shareholders. As fate would have it, the decline in sales brought to an end the production of a rather iconic gem in its heydays.

Most of its subsequent models ceased production in 1939 but there was a one-off production known as “Sunshine Special” produced in 1942. Granted, this car lived at a rather full and beloved loved life.